Flux & Flow

I'm just a kid searching for answers. I will probably post random things from the internet here...

sci-universe:

These are the depictions of the most intense meteor storm in recorded history – the Leonid meteor storm of 1833. The Leonid meteor shower is annually active in the month of November, and it occurs when the Earth passes through the debris left by the comet Tempel-Tuttle. While the typical rates are about 10 to 15 meteors per hour, the storm of 1833 is speculated to have been over 100,000 meteors per hour, frightening people half to death.
Here’s how Agnes Clerke, an astronomer witnessing the event, described it:  “On the night of November 12-13, 1833, a tempest of falling stars broke over the Earth… The sky was scored in every direction with shining tracks and illuminated with majestic fireballs. At Boston, the frequency of meteors was estimated to be about half that of flakes of snow in an average snowstorm.” (x)

(via pyrrhiccomedy)

jedavu:

An Aerial View of Anish Kapoor’s Reflective ‘Cloud Gate’ Sculpture
Photographer Gray Malin was recently in Chicago where he shot a number of amazing aerial photos around the city including beaches, Navy Pier, and spots around Millenium Park. For some reason, even though it’s been on view for nearly 8 years now, I’ve never seen a photo of Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate taken from directly above like this. It looks almost exactly like a small lake filled with Chicago’s skyline. 

jedavu:

An Aerial View of Anish Kapoor’s Reflective ‘Cloud Gate’ Sculpture

Photographer Gray Malin was recently in Chicago where he shot a number of amazing aerial photos around the city including beaches, Navy Pier, and spots around Millenium Park. For some reason, even though it’s been on view for nearly 8 years now, I’ve never seen a photo of Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate taken from directly above like this. It looks almost exactly like a small lake filled with Chicago’s skyline. 

jedavu:

A Quiet Day in Wonderland by Nikita Gill

edwardspoonhands:

off-width:

hoodvale:

This post always slaps me in the face

Wow, no kidding.

This is not technically true…time did not exist before the big bang, so you really only spent 13.98 billion years not being born yet. Still a lot of years.

edwardspoonhands:

off-width:

hoodvale:

This post always slaps me in the face

Wow, no kidding.

This is not technically true…time did not exist before the big bang, so you really only spent 13.98 billion years not being born yet. Still a lot of years.

(Source: stresscomic)

Anonymous asked: is the whole 'no perfect mirrors' thing the reason why i look so good in a mirror and then someone takes a photo and I look really not good?

pyrrhiccomedy:

No, that’s because what you look like in a mirror is reversed from what you look like in real life (and in photographs). Unless you’re a supermodel, you’re almost definitely not perfectly symmetrical. You’re used to the way you look, though, so you probably don’t notice your own facial irregularities. When you see your familiar face flipped back-to-front, though, all the irregularities pop out because you’re seeing your face with fresh eyes.

Before you freak out, nobody else notices your facial irregularities, either. They’re also used to the way you look, and their brains have stopped registering those little errors in symmetry. It’s just that, to them, the face that they’re used to is also the face in the photographs. That’s why your friends usually think you look a lot better in pictures than you do, while at the same time lamenting at how awful THEY look (when you think they look fine). It’s not just insecurity at work: you are all, individually, being confronted with an unfamiliar version of yourself.

jedavu:

Drawings by artist Katie Rose Pipkin